Get to the Point

by Ron Rosenberg

Tandem skydive

Effective marketing isn’t really all that complicated: identify a need, develop a product or service that meets that need, and “connect the dots.”

Unfortunately, many people get hung up on the process of actually making this all happen, frequently committing the cardinal sin of confusing features with benefits. We’ve invested a good deal of time on this subject over the years, but to summarize, features are about you; benefits are about your customer, client, or member.

So with that in mind, we have a trio of examples to share with you this month to illustrate just what we’re talking about...

We Don’t Hit the Ground...

For our daughter's birthday, she did something she's wanted to try for quite a while: skydiving. Needless to say, we weren't overly thrilled by the idea, but it was her decision, so we all went to the airstrip to watch her jump.

We were all concerned with the safety of the jump, but our daughter seemed just as concerned with how good she was going to look in the outfit she was wearing. She was joking with her instructor about this, and said, “I want to make sure I look good when I hit the ground–referring, of course, to her safe landing.

The instructor immediately replied, “We don’t ‘hit the ground’–we land.”

And then they all proceeded to participate in a detailed class where the "features," which included the safety checks, the classroom training session, and the maintenance of the equipment, were extensively discussed. The "benefit" of course, was a safe landing.

He got to the point.

Are You Better Off Now?

The year was 1980. The USA hockey team had pulled off the “Miracle on Ice”–a stunning upset of the former Soviet Union in the semi-final game at the Winter Olympics.

52 Americans were still in captivity in Iran after a group of militant students took over the American Embassy in Tehran.

And we were in the midst of a presidential election–the first one I actually got to vote in–pitting the incumbent President Jimmy Carter against California Governor Ronald Reagan.

In the closing comments of their final televised debate, Reagan included the following challenge:

“Next Tuesday all of you will go to the polls, will stand there in the polling place and make a decision. I think when you make that decision, it might be well if you would ask yourself, are you better off than you were four years ago?

Is it easier for you to go and buy items in the stores than it was four years ago? Is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago?

Is America as respected throughout the world as it was? Do you feel that our security is as safe, that we’re as strong as we were four years ago?”

He went on to say that if you could answer “yes” to all of these questions, then you should vote for Carter; if not, then you should vote for him.

In that single, brilliant, example of “features vs. benefits” he succeeded in making the entire election about one simple issue: your personal economic situation.

One week later, Reagan won the election in a landslide victory, winning 44 states, and receiving more electoral votes (489) than any non-incumbent candidate in history.

He went on to win re-election to a second term in 1984 on the strength of a strong economic recovery, this time winning 49 states and 525 electoral votes–the most ever in history.

He got to the point.

What’s Your Motivation?

At the end of most of my live events, we include an action-planning session where the attendees take a few minutes to consider what they’ve learned, how they’re going to implement something from the session in the next 30 to 90 days, and what specific benefits–both monetary and non-monetary–they’ll receive when they’re successful.

At one program, when reviewing the responses on the plane ride home, I laughed out loud–the action the person was going to implement was to quit smoking. The benefits he wrote down as expected outcomes were, “Keep wife, more golf money.”

Now, there are certainly more benefits that come along with ending a smoking habit, like better health, more energy, and a longer life, but these, although really important, are a bit intangible.

Keeping a spouse happy and having more money to spend on a hobby are more immediate, more motivating, and more likely to lead to the desired results.

He got to the point.

Communication is Key...

You might have the highest-quality product and the best service on the planet, but if you insist on talking about the features instead of communicating the benefits, you won’t get anywhere near the results you should.

Features are about you. Benefits are about them. Got the point?

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August Interview

Cher Holton, Ph.D.

The Holton Consulting Group

How to Build Teams that Deliver Extraordinary Results

Considering all the people you work with on various teams, it sometimes seems like a miracle that anything actually gets done. Fortunately, there are specific actions you can take to build teams that deliver extraordinary results; and this month, Cher Holton, one of the leaders in the field of teamwork and president of The Holton Consulting Group, Inc., will explain how to make it all work.

Fortunately, there are specific actions you can take to build teams that deliver extraordinary results; and this month, Cher Holton, one of the leaders in the field of teamwork and president of The Holton Consulting Group, Inc., will explain how to make it all work.

You'll discover:

  • The issues that impact individual performance
  • Roadblocks to effective teamwork
  • Team-building exercises that actually deliver results!

 

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