Like Poker? Learn Trading.

By Ron Rosenberg

Photo gambling chips on the dark

Several years ago, our son worked as a professional poker player.  He had a good run for several years, but the actual lifestyle wasn’t sustainable if he wanted to have a “real life” and meaningful relationships.

During this time, he received a steady stream of invitations to visit various casinos and participate in some pretty major tournaments.  All of this made perfect sense from the perspective of “message-to-market match” – one of the most important marketing concepts we promote.

The mailings they sent were targeted to the person who was most likely to respond, based on his demographic and previous behavior.  A list of previous tournament entrants would be a great place to start when you’re hosting a tournament of your own, just as a list of participants in one triathlon would be appropriate for another one in a nearby city.
 
Crossover Targeting
 
Something like that is so obvious, it almost doesn’t need to be mentioned. But what if you “zoom out” just a little bit and ask yourself the question: “Who else might be interested?”
 
For example, let’s look at that same list of triathlon participants. Someone who has had the focus and discipline to train and prepare for an event like that might also be interested in:
  •  Registering for a 10K race
  • Signing up for a charity fund-raising bike ride
  • Joining a newly opened health club
  • Buying home-exercise equipment
  • Trying out a new restaurant that features healthy food
In other words, when you’re trying to find sources for new lead generation, you need to have a clear picture of who your ideal prospects are, and then ask yourself, “Where can I find these people?”
 
Where Can You Find Them?
 
So let’s take the last example and turn it around 180 degrees. Rather than asking what triathlon participants might be interested in, you could look at other communities where you would find participants that might be interested in a triathlon and reach out to them. For instance:
  •  Local running and swim clubs
  •  Neighborhoods that have community pools
  • City and town recreation departments
  •  Residents of the neighborhoods surrounding the hosting health club
  •  Local running and sporting-goods stores
Each one of these sources could be targeted in a variety of ways to get your well-crafted message to prospects who might be compelled to register for your event.
 
But there’s no reason to stop there…
 
Zoom a Little Farther Out… 
 
Let’s say you’re promoting a high-end transatlantic cruise.  Your broad target market might be couples between the ages of 50 and 75 within a high level of disposable income. What's good about this demographic is that they still read print magazines, giving you a great opportunity to run a display ad with a link to a landing page where they could get a special discount or free information.
 
Which groups might you target?  Which magazines might be good to look at?  How about ones that cater to some of these activities:
  •  Golf
  • Tennis
  •  Travel
  • Wine
  • Travel
A series of display ads could go a long way, especially since you could give each ad a definite theme tied to the particular activity.
 
Now Zoom Way Out… 
 
This brings us to the title of this article. I happened to be looking at a website for a poker tournament, and on it were several banner ads for various tournaments, casinos, and online poker sites. There I found the image at the beginning of this article.
 
The ad was for a site that promoted trading in “Binary Options.”  This is a highly speculative strategy that many experts consider to be extremely risky and unpredictable. They say you might just get better results if you invested your savings by playing the slot machines at a casino.
 
The important observation is not that people are promoting courses to learn how to do this, but rather that they’ve identified poker players as the type of people who would be attracted to this kind of approach.  
 
Essentially, this is promoting gambling to gamblers, and it’s a very clever strategy, and one that wouldn’t be obvious without applying some deliberate thinking to the situation.
 
Where Are Your New Leads Hiding?
 
These are just a few examples of how you can apply this approach when you’re trying to find new markets or expand current ones. It does require some thought – and definitely some creative thinking – but it will provide opportunities most other people won’t uncover!

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